Category Archives: Medical Malpractice Defense

Medical Malpractice Defense: Misreading Imaging Reports

When patients undergo diagnostic imaging tests, it is reasonable for them to assume that the results will be detailed enough for their provider to interpret them accurately. Medicine is far from an exact science, though, and the images that result from X-rays, CT scans, and MRI machines can be challenging to read in certain cases. When an imaging test does not yield clear results, the physician has a duty to order additional scans or to perform some other kind of
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Insufficient Credentialing

When a patient receives substandard care and suffers an injury or dies as a result, his or her treating physician can expect to face a medical malpractice lawsuit. It is rare for the provider to be the only defendant, though, because claimants want to recover as much compensation as possible. By naming multiple individuals or organizations in their claim, injured parties are not limited to recovering from a single insurance policy and therefore increase their chances of securing a sizable
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Wrongful Birth

It is always tragic when a newborn sustains a birth injury or is diagnosed with a birth defect. Depending on the nature and severity of the infant’s condition, parents may incur millions of dollars in costs due to healthcare, mobility aids, medical equipment, and home care before the child has even reached preschool age. Because the financial burden can be so great, parents are often left searching for any possible way to maintain financial security and help their child live
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Medical Malpractice Defense: ADA Violations

Implemented in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities. The ADA applies to numerous contexts including employment, pubic transportation, telecommunication, and medical care. Title III of the ADA covers private hospitals and clinics while Title II covers public hospitals and state- or federal-run clinics. Both sections require healthcare providers to accommodate patients with disabilities by ensuring full access to their facilities and modifying policies, practices, and procedures as
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Medical Malpractice Claims: When to Settle & When to Fight

Most practicing physicians will face allegations of medical malpractice at some point in their careers. According to The New England Journal of Medicine, 75 percent of providers in low-risk specialties will face a claim by 65 years old, as will 99 percent of physicians in high-risk specialties such as neurosurgery and thoracic-cardiovascular surgery. Facing a lawsuit is not really a question of if for most providers but, rather, of when. If you recently found out that one of your past
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Could I Lose My House in a Medical Malpractice Lawsuit?

Upon learning that a patient intends to sue you for medical malpractice, it is natural to imagine all the worst possible outcomes. In addition to worrying about your reputation, you may be concerned about losing your license to practice medicine or even losing your home and other assets. Although 80 percent of medical malpractice claims do not result in any kind of payout, 20 percent of these cases do result in compensation for the claimant, and monetary awards are often
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Newborn Clavicle Fractures

A clavicle fracture, or broken collarbone, is a fairly minor birth injury that often happens during difficult vaginal deliveries. Although such fractures typically heal in a matter of weeks without any medical intervention, new parents often look for someone to blame for this complication. If you are being sued over a newborn clavicle fracture, it is essential to start planning your defense immediately. The Florida medical malpractice defense lawyers at Lubell Rosen are here to help. After evaluating the circumstances
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How Can Medical Malpractice Result in Brain Damage?

A brain injury can have lifelong repercussions that affect nearly every aspect of a person’s life. Some of the most common causes of brain damage include motor-vehicle collisions, sports injuries, falls, strokes, and drug abuse. Medical negligence can also cause brain damage—even when the procedure does not target the central nervous system. If you are being sued for a procedure you performed that allegedly resulted in brain damage, you should seek legal counsel as soon as possible so you can
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Lack of Informed Consent

Regardless of how much experience you have diagnosing and treating a particular condition, your patients ultimately have the final say. In most cases, people have the right to choose their scope of care, and their providers must respect this right. In order to make reasonable and relatively safe choices, though, patients must have some understanding of their options, as well as the advantages and potential side effects of each treatment modality. This is called informed consent, which is a legal
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3 Common Prescription Errors & Advice for Doctors Being Sued

Medication errors take many forms. For example, pharmaceutical companies can produce defective drugs, advertisers can misrepresent the medication, doctors can prescribe the wrong drug, pharmacists can prepare the wrong prescription, and nurses can administer the wrong dosage. According to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, common causes of medication mistakes include poor communication, job stress, lack of adequate training or experience, ambiguities regarding the prescription, misapplied techniques, and patient confusion. Despite the fact that various parties could ultimately be responsible
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What Are “WSPEs” and Why Do They Occur?

Doctors throughout the United States perform millions of surgeries and other medical procedures every single year. In 2010, for example, doctors completed approximately 51 million inpatient procedures and 48.3 million outpatient procedures. When diagnosing and treating patients, providers always take steps to avoid mistakes, but when you consider just how many surgeries are performed annually, it is almost surprising that more errors do not occur. According to WebMD, doctors make approximately 4,000 preventable mistakes during surgical procedures every year. Between
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Retained Surgical Bodies

The operating room is a chaotic place. Even during routine procedures that pose few risks, surgeons are essentially racing against the clock to ensure they complete everything before the anesthesia has worn off or complications arise. Doctors need to be cautious of moving too fast in the OR, though, because rushing through a procedure can also cause complications. For example, surgeons who do not make precise incisions can puncture an organ or damage nearby nerves. Likewise, those who race to
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Ultrasound Errors

Most people probably associate ultrasound scans with pregnant women who are eager to get a glimpse of their growing baby, but experienced providers know prenatal imaging is just one of the many uses of ultrasound technology. At the end of the day, sonography is a valuable diagnostic tool that helps doctors identify conditions affecting various organs throughout the body, including the heart, liver, spleen, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys, bladder, uterus, ovaries, and testicles. According to the American Cancer Society, for example,
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3 Common Malpractice Claims & Advice for Doctors Being Sued

Practicing medicine is one of the most stressful professions in the modern world. Doctors may be different from police officers, soldiers, and construction workers in that their own lives are not at risk, but they must bear the burden of protecting others’ lives every single day. Unfortunately, since medicine is far from an exact science, healthcare providers are not always able to save their patients. Regardless, people expect a lot from their physicians, and when complications arise, malpractice lawsuits are
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Understanding the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Medical Malpractice

Every medical procedure poses certain risks, and every patient has the right to know about those risks before undergoing a particular screening, exam, or treatment. When a patient agrees to a procedure despite knowing the risks, this is called “informed consent.” Getting informed consent is important not only to ensure patients are aware of potential complications but also to protect healthcare providers from medical malpractice claims. Laws regarding informed consent were first implemented in the early twentieth century. In 1914,
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Medication Errors

When a doctor prescribes a medication, it is reasonable for the patient to assume that the drug is going to help. At the very least, it should not cause any unexpected side effects if it is taken as directed. Unfortunately, medication mistakes happen all the time and can result in devastating complications. The National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention defines medication errors as preventable events that may cause inappropriate drug use or lead to patient harm. Although
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Misdiagnosis

When you hear hoof beats, don’t look for zebras; look for horses. What might sound like instructions to a zoology apprentice is actually a fundamental principle in diagnostic medicine. Dr. Theodore Woodward coined this oft-quoted zebra maxim in the 1940s to remind physicians to consider the simplest and most common cause of any given symptom before testing for rarer conditions. Additionally, if a patient does present unusual symptoms, he or she is more likely to be experiencing rare complications of
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Anesthesia Errors

It is common for anesthesiologists to administer various anesthetics to 500,000 patients over the course of their careers. Each time a patient receives anesthesia is an opportunity for a mistake to occur, and when anesthesia errors do happen, they often have severe or fatal consequences. If you are facing a medical malpractice lawsuit over an alleged anesthesia error, turn to Lubell Rosen. Our lawyers have the experience, resources, and proven legal strategies to defend your interests during every stage of
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Foreign Objects Left Inside Patients

Leaving a foreign object inside a patient is considered a “never event,” which the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services define as a preventable error that should never happen during the course of treatment. Despite its classification as such, leaving objects inside patients happens fairly often. Officially called a “retained surgical item,” this scenario occurs in hospitals all over the country at least a dozen times per day. Once patients realize what has happened, they typically file a medical malpractice
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Brachial Plexus Injuries

Brachial plexus injuries are among the most serious types of injuries a newborn can sustain due to a difficult delivery. According to the Mayo Clinic, factors that increase the chances of nerve damage in the neck and shoulder area during labor and delivery include prolonged labor, breeched presentation, and a high birth weight. A severe injury that causes considerable damage can result in neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP), which is characterized by partial or total paralysis of the arm. ScienceDirect
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What Can Dentists Do to Prevent Medical Malpractice Lawsuits?

Both procedural errors and misdiagnoses have the potential to cause catastrophic damages, but surgeons and internists are not the only practitioners likely to face malpractice lawsuits. At the end of the day, patients can file a claim against virtually any healthcare provider or facility, including dentists and dental clinics, if they believe they received substandard care. According to The New England Journal of Medicine, physicians in every specialty have a high risk of facing a malpractice lawsuit at some point
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Nerve Damage During Surgery

Nearly 20 million Americans have some form of peripheral neuropathy, which is nerve damage that affects sensory, motor, or automatic nerves. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, physical trauma is the leading cause of acquired peripheral neuropathy. Nerves can become severed, compressed, stretched, crushed, or detached during forceful impacts, such as motor vehicle collisions and falls, or during contact sports and other related activities. Surgical procedures can also result in nerve damage. When they do, a
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What Is Alarm Fatigue, and How Can Healthcare Providers Prevent It?

Advancements in both medicine and technology have made it easy for healthcare providers to monitor vital signs continuously and in real time when treating patients. Although relying on such equipment can—and does—save lives, there is one major drawback of using it for virtually every patient in every scenario. According to The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Advanced Critical Care, up to 99 percent of clinical alarms are false. That means when a patient is actually in distress and an alarm
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3 Defense Strategies Against Claims Involving Delayed Diagnosis

Medicine is far from an exact science, and there are countless ways healthcare providers can make mistakes when working with patients. At the end of the day, though, every single error falls under one of just two categories: diagnosis mistakes or treatment mistakes. Even if you are a caring, compassionate, and meticulous healthcare provider, you can expect to face a malpractice lawsuit at some point in your career. According to the Insurance Journal, nearly every doctor is named in at
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Medical Malpractice Defense: Delayed Diagnosis of Cancer

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. One of the factors contributing to cancer’s high mortality rate is the fact that the symptoms are not always easy to diagnose, and they often mimic other conditions. Even when a physician follows all accepted standards of care, it’s still possible for cancer to be diagnosed late—when more invasive treatment is required or when the condition has become terminal. If you are being sued for the delayed diagnosis
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