Category Archives: Probate

Marriage, Minimum Distributions, and Mayhem: A Discussion of IRA’s under Florida’s New Elective Share Statute

This article was originally published in June 2002 by Kristen M. Lynch for The Florida Bar Journal. The original article can be found here: source On October 1, 2001, Florida’s new elective share statute, new F.S. §732.2035(7), became effective. To most, this would not seem to be an event of utmost significance, but to those of us dealing in the world of IRA administration every day, this means change. Historically, IRAs and qualified plans have not been subject to probate
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The Top 5 Things Practitioners need to know about IRA’s Now; A Discussion of State Law, Case Law and other Considerations

This article was originally published in August 2004 by Kristen M. Lynch for The Florida Bar Journal. The original article can be found here: source Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are most often thought of as tax-deferred accounts that the government conjured up in the 1980s to encourage Americans to save for retirement. With almost $10 trillion in tax-deferred retirement accounts, $2.5 trillion of which is estimated to be held in IRAs, they have become an estate and tax planning force
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When Good IRA’s Go Bad: Common Pre-and-Post Mortem IRA problems with Uncommonly Bad Results

This article was originally published in December 2005 by Kristen M. Lynch for The Florida Bar Journal. The original article can be found here: source Individual Retirement Accounts are tax-deferred accounts that, if handled properly, can be an effective vehicle for retirement and can be passed on to a surviving spouse or other heirs while retaining the deferral of income tax. The new IRA rules enacted a few years ago provide post-mortem planning opportunities in an area that previously had
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