Category Archives: Uncategorized

Disruptive Patients – What to Do?

DISRUPTIVE PATIENTS- What to do? A physician, who is a client of the firm, recently asked for our assistance in dealing with a new patient who already had disrupted the practice. Because of the disruption caused by this patient during their first encounter with the practice, the physician decided they did not want to run the risk of taking on this patient and having them further disrupt the practice. The physician reached out to us at the time the patient
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The Top 5 Things Practitioners need to know about IRA’s Now; A Discussion of State Law, Case Law and other Considerations

This article was originally published in August 2004 by Kristen M. Lynch for The Florida Bar Journal. The original article can be found here: source Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are most often thought of as tax-deferred accounts that the government conjured up in the 1980s to encourage Americans to save for retirement. With almost $10 trillion in tax-deferred retirement accounts, $2.5 trillion of which is estimated to be held in IRAs, they have become an estate and tax planning force
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Broward County attending physician held liable for $2,422,500.00 despite carrying malpractice insurance.

Another recent wrongful death lawsuit against an insured attending physician in Broward county demonstrates just how important personal counsel can be when the damages of a case threaten to exceed the limits of a physician’s malpractice insurance policy. In 2014, an attending physician, Dr. A.M., was sued for medical malpractice and the wrongful death of his hospital patient.  A family medicine doctor, neurologist and cardiologist were also named as defendants.  The case concerned a patient who presented with symptoms of
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Palm Beach Doctor held liable for $668,000 plus attorney’s fees, despite carrying malpractice insurance

Contrary to popular belief, medical malpractice insurance does not insulate a physician against personal financial exposure. In fact, most doctors in Florida only carry $250,000 in coverage when the malpractice verdicts commonly exceed $1,000,000.  You can do the math yourself.  Personal counsel can assist a physician by providing legal advice to best protect a physician against personal exposure when the damages of a case threaten to exceed the limits of the malpractice insurance policy. A recent wrongful death lawsuit against
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Workers with Varying Hourly Rates Have Variable Overtime Rates an Employer Must Pay Or Risk Getting Sued Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Overtime seems like an easy concept; the employee is entitled to 150% of their regular hourly pay for every hour of overtime they work. However, under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) there are special rules for employees who make different rates throughout the course of the week, and when those different jobs count as independent employment, versus when the work at both jobs must be counted towards the employee’s forty hours per-week. A typical situation where this arises is
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GAINING THE ADVANTAGE HANDLING FRIVOLOUS LAWSUITS

The cost of doing business successfully today, is that lawsuits are bound to happen, and many of them will be frivolous lawsuits. Routinely frivolous lawsuits are pursued by attorneys who know that even a frivolous lawsuit can be successful against companies who know it is cheaper to pay a settlement than spend years paying attorneys to wind through state court systems. There is a way to fight back, using a trick that puts frivolous lawsuit filers into waters they do
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A WRITTEN AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) POLICY IS ESSENTIAL TO PROTECT YOUR BUSINESS AGAINST LAWSUITS

The word disability has a very broad meaning under the ADA, and conditions you would not think are disabilities can lead to costly lawsuits if an employer does not have a policy to properly handle ADA Accommodation requests by employees. Believe it or not, an appellate court has held an employer liable for not allowing an employee with a sleep disorder to show up to work late every day. However, not all accommodations are required. The most important thing for
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GAINING THE ADVANTAGE HADLING FRIVOLOUS LAWSUITS

The cost of doing business successfully today, is that lawsuits are bound to happen, and many of them will be frivolous lawsuits. Routinely frivolous lawsuits are pursued by attorneys who know that even a frivolous lawsuit can be successful against companies who know it is cheaper to pay a settlement than spend years paying attorneys to wind through state court systems. There is a way to fight back, using a trick that puts frivolous lawsuit filers into waters they do
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Title VII Requires Employers to Accommodate Employees’ Religious Beliefs, Some But Not All of the Time

Title VII prevents an employer from discriminating on the basis of religion against employees, and applicants for employment. In order not to discriminate an employer must be willing to offer religious accommodations in some, but not all cases. A religious accommodation is an exception to a rule, procedure, job requirement, or standard, because an employee’s, or applicant’s, religious beliefs are violated by one of these workplace requirements. An example of a workplace accommodation is allowing a Muslim woman to wear
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Accommodating an Employee is Not Always Required Under the ADA and Other Federal Regulations

On Tuesday a Federal Court in New Jersey ruled that the Port Authority would not be subject to a lawsuit for discrimination based on their failure to accommodate a Jewish employee’s request not to work on the Sabbath and Jewish Holidays. This does not mean that employers are free to ignore an employee who asks for accommodations. Religious accommodations have different requirements based on what type of employer you are. Private employers face cases based on an employee’s religion infrequently
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An Illegal Immigrant Can Sue Their Employer in Federal Court

One of the most common misconceptions that employers have is that illegal immigrants cannot sue their employers. Illegal immigrants can sue their employers in Federal Court for the non-payment of minimum wage, and overtime, pay under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Under the FLSA it does not matter whether someone is in the country illegally, nor will they be deported for filing a lawsuit. There are places in the country where an illegal immigrant cannot bring a Federal Lawsuit,
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What does “And those Similarly Situated” mean next to the Plaintiff’s Name in a Fair Labor Standards Act Lawsuit

Next to the Plaintiff’s name in a Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) lawsuit there are often a variation of the words “and all those similarly situated” or “and those similarly situated.” Variations on “and those similarly situated” are very dangerous words if you are a business owner. The words can turn a lawsuit brought against an employer by one employee, into a lawsuit brought against an employer by several past and present employees, who the Court forces the employer to
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A Surge in Lawsuits by Tipped Employees

Large restaurant chains have paid millions of dollars in settlement money for improper tip pooling arrangements. There are trends in lawsuits under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Recently, suits by tipped employees suing their employers has become popular. Restaurants and bars of all sizes, across the country, are being sued by tipped employees who claim that they were tipped improperly. This is because there are a set of complex regulations as to how tipped employees are paid, and how
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Just Because an Employee is Salaried Does Not Mean an Employer Does Not Have to Pay Overtime

One of the most common mistakes that employers make is believing that because they pay employees a salary, the employers do not need to pay the employees overtime. There are employees who receive a salary, and do not need to be paid overtime because they are exempt from the law’s requirement to pay overtime. However, the duties that an employee performs, their training, and their position, determine whether they are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s (“FLSA”) overtime requirements,
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A Game Changers for Employers sued by Employees By: Joshua H. Sheskin, Esq.

For employees, whose employers classify them as exempt from overtime requirements, it just became harder to sue their employers. If an employee is exempt, an employer does not need to pay them overtime. Common exempt employees include, but are not limited to, managers, administrators, supervisors, chefs, commercial drivers, domestic employees, and commissioned salespeople. Until recently, when an employee sued an employer for unpaid overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), there was a strong legal presumption against the employer,
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Carlos H. Arce, Esq. Interview

https://www.telemundo51.com/noticias/destacados/Los-gastos-m_dicos-tras-la-mordida-de-un-mapache_TLMD---Miami-493540311.html