Tag Archives: labor lawyer

Tipped Employees can still sue under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) depending on their tasks.

For about thirty years the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Rule has been that a tipped employee who receives less pay per-hour, because they are a tipped employee, must spend 80% of their time at work doing activities that are tip generating. This means 80% of the employees, time had to be spent on tasks directly related to serving the customer, thereby directly generating tips. Hence, napkin folding, “opening the restaurant,” and other tasks would need to be kept to less than 20% of a tipped employee’s time at work. In November of 2018 the Department of Labor rolled back this Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) guidance for tipped employees. However, courts have consistently held that the rule is still in effect, allowing cases to move forward against Buffalo Wild Wings, and Denny’s, as if the rule had not changed. The status of this rule, and how courts will treat it, changes constantly, and depends on the judge, because the Department of Labor rolling back this Fair Labor Standards Act rule for tipped employees was not done in the traditional way that agency rules change.

Whether one assumes that 80% of the time a tipped employee works must be spent on tipped activities to satisfy the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), or less due to the rollback of the rule, what counts as a tipped activity is very specific and defined through hundreds of court decisions. Many activities that restaurants would normally consider tip generating tasks, are not tip generating tasks. It is difficult to know which tasks are tip generating, versus non-tip generating, without a Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) lawyer to guide you through the legal swamp that is tipped versus non-tipped tasks under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). For help in determining if your tipped employees are spending eighty percent of their time on tipped tasks, or if you have been sued by a tipped employee claiming to have done more than the allowed percentage of non-tipped tasks, call Joshua Sheskin at the South Florida Headquarters of Lubell Rosen. – Joshua H. Sheskin,Esq., 954-880-9500, jhs@lubellrosen.com

Workers with Varying Hourly Rates Have Variable Overtime Rates an Employer Must Pay Or Risk Getting Sued Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Overtime seems like an easy concept; the employee is entitled to 150% of their regular hourly pay for every hour of overtime they work. However, under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) there are special rules for employees who make different rates throughout the course of the week, and when those different jobs count as independent employment, versus when the work at both jobs must be counted towards the employee’s forty hours per-week. A typical situation where this arises is in a restaurant where an employee sometimes acts as a manager and sometimes as a server, in this case the hours worked as a manager and as a server may or may not need to be added together to determine if overtime is owed, it depends on how you have set up that employment arrangement on paper with the employee. On that note, if management and service is set up improperly, then if the employee makes more as a manager, than they do as a server, you cannot pay them overtime rates based on whether the overtime hours were as a manager or server, nor take the lower of the two numbers.  When an employee has a varying hourly rate, getting the overtime calculation wrong can lead to a very expensive Federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) suit. If you do not have a contract in place with a worker who does what you think are two separate jobs, a contract that is legally adequate to distinguish the jobs under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), then you can also face an expensive FLSA lawsuit. For help in avoiding expensive federal lawsuits when paying employees varying hourly rates call Attorney Joshua Sheskin at Lubell Rosen